View Your Cart






hello girls from the switchboard

Color


colors - red and yellow

Color is such a wonderful thing. We all have certain colors we like, but some get confused as to what colors are and how to use them together. Knowing about colors can help you, if you'll learn just a few basics.

There are only six colors. Three primary colors and three secondary colors and everything else has to fall into one of those categories. If someone said to you, "I would like to have a quilt made with Brown, Pink and Cream." You would be able to say back to them that those were not colors. And, you would be correct. So, if someone wanted Brown in his or her quilt, which color group would that fall into? What color is Pink? Or Cream? Let's go to the beginning. When we were in first grade, we were taught the primary colors. Do you remember? They are Red, Blue and Yellow. The only other colors are secondary colors and that happens when we add two of the primary colors together.

For example:

·Red and Yellow make Orange, Red and Blue make Purple, and Yellow and Blue make Green.

.By the way, White and Black are not colors.

That is a total of 6 colors, RED, YELLOW, BLUE, ORANGE, GREEN AND PURPLE and that's all you get. Everything else is called a Hue*, which means deviation from pure color. It's no wonder we get confused about all this when every color manufacturer has a special name for each color they come out with. So, what color is brown?

I'll explain.

·Of the six colors we have, there is a light, medium, and dark version of that color. After all, if there were no light, there wouldn't be color at all.

·Think about yellow - It can be so light that it appears to be - Cream It can be so dark that it becomes Brown - So, the Brown and the Cream in the above-mentioned quilt both become Yellows.

·What about the Pink? How do we get what we call Pink? We start with Red and add White to it. That's all Pink is. So the colors that person really wanted her quilt to be is Red with light and dark Yellow. Since Red and Yellow are both primaries, they will look wonderful together. I can guarantee you that the finest paintings completed by the "Old Masters" were never painted without the three primary colors.

If you ever see a quilt with colors you just absolutely love, but have trouble seeing what's really there. Ask yourself these 4 questions:

1.What color do I see? (Has to be one of six)

2.What hue is it? (It can be a pure color or a hue – you have to figure out which it is)

3.What tone is it? (Is it light, middle value or dark)

4.What intensity is it? (Is the saturation of color - an emerald vs. an olive)

Working with color can be so much fun. Have your favorite quilt shop teach a class on color if you want to know more or are having trouble with it in your quilts.

*Hue is a two-word color. For example: A pure color would be RED - a Hue would be an Orange/Red, Yellow/Red, Purple/Red.

Lynda Hall

NOTE: The quilt shown above is Snow Trails....the colors used were Red (pinks) and two values of yellow (light yellow-cream, and dark yellow-brown) 

Complimentary Colors




Complimentary colors are colors that compliment each other and are across from each other on the color wheel. You have three primary colors with three secondary colors that compliment - a total of 6 colors in all.

Most of the time when you see a quilt that you think is beautiful and you can't quite take your eyes off of it, it's because the maker put together colors that are complimentary to each other.If you don't know which colors compliment each other, do yourself a favor and go to an art store or quilt store and pick up a Color Wheel. Having this tool in front of you when you are choosing colors will help you decide which ones you need to compliment what you have chosen as your main colors.

For example: Let's say you want to make a quilt using Red, Black and Cream. What colors are you looking for?

·First: Black is not a color!

·There isn't a color as Cream: so you need to first put it into a category (Blue, Red, Yellow, Green, Orange or Purple - which one is it?) It's Yellow.

·Red is a color on the color wheel So, now I have chosen Red, Yellow and Black for my quilt. When you are choosing fabrics for your quilt you want to pick out the Red, Yellow (Creams) and Blacks that you want to use, but to add additional dimension to your quilt, use complimentary colors as well. Complimentary colors do just that - they need to compliment or add to, not diminish the look of your quilt. So, add them sparingly!!!!!

·Red is a color in the quilt, so on your color wheel directly across from the Red you will see Green so let's add that to the colors for the quilt.

.Yellow is a color in the quilt. On your color wheel directly across from Yellow, you will see Purple. Add Purples to the mix.

Let's see: now you have Red, Yellow (or Cream), Black, Green and some Purples. When you put these together in your own quilt, it will be fantastic. If you decide to make a quilt using these colors, I'd love to see it.

 

Having Fun




Hello, I'm Lynda Hall of Primitive Pieces by Lynda. I've been designing quilts for patterns for almost 3 years now. Since I started my line of quilt patterns, I've been able to design and create 28. Out of those 28 patterns, 16 of them have been hand quilted by me; you see I'm a one-woman show (except for my Mom who does most of the appliqué for me). I'm not telling you this to brag, but to tell you that I'm having a whole lot of fun doing what I'm doing.

I've just recently started teaching others, and it amazes me what I see and hear. It's quite obvious right off the bat that I have horrible sewing habits; although I took home economics in school, my mother is a wonderful with a needle and my Gramma was a dressmaker. I don't press every time I sew a seam, I don't always use the same colored thread, and I don't like to cut plaids (which are my favorite) straight. I love the way it makes my quilt all g-woppied when the plaids are crooked.

You see, I love primitives and the fact that I can make a new quilt look as old as if my Gramma made it makes me happy. Remember the saying, "She did the best she could".It seems that others think exact measurements are a must, that pressing each seam takes precedent over all else and that if point and/or corner doesn't exactly come together perfect — red flags start popping up and the seam ripper once again gets over used. Can you imagine the number of people that would be in attendance if the frogger club (rip-it, rip-it, and rip-it!) ever met? I bet Martha wouldn't be there!

I listen to people,who after making a quilt are never happy with the end result...I wonder why that is? As soon as the quilt is finished they get the shoulda, coulda, woulda's. Obviously it's some kind of mechanism that gives us an out if someone says, "Maybe you should have done it..?" "You could have made it with more..." or "Wouldn't it have been better if..." When we start a hobby, it should be with one thing in mind: fun! Why would we do something that is going to take up lots of our time, hurt our fingers, and destroy our budgets, if not for enjoyment? Must we suffer through everything we do? This is supposed to be fun...we have jobs so we can suffer.

Just the cost of said hobby would be enough to rival the national debt wouldn't it? Maybe we should reassess why we go through the motions only to be unsatisfied with what we do.

Making a quilt for my pattern line has to be fun or I'm not going to do it. If a design I come up with has inset seams...they either get taken out, or someone else can make the quilt, especially if the pieces are too small, or the colors are not what will make me happy, etc., etc., etc. I really believe everyone should be true to themselves.

If when I'm making a quilt, a seam on a 9 patch doesn't come together exactly right — then that's the way it's supposed to be and I try harder the next time. If a star point gets included in the seam allowance, then isn't that the way it's supposed to be? If I appliqué a piece for a quilt and a stitch gets a little to big, or if I'm hand quilting and a stitch becomes a toe hooker is it the end of the world? I don't think so.

Have you ever done any of those things and they come out right? I think that calls for some sort of celebration...or at least a hot fudge sundae!

If you are making a border and it doesn't fit because it's to short (well, of course you measured!) then scab a piece on to make it work. If the post block isn't in the corner, who cares? If it's too long, then whack it off. Relax, smile and tell everyone you just planned it that way.

If you sew the entire quilt together and see a mistake smack dab in the middle: explain that you did that just to keep everyone on their toes and that they get the prize because they found it.

What I do know is that it's not brain surgery. There is something to be said of the person that can make a quilt and say, "Wow, good job! I really like what I did."The next time you hear yourself complain about what you're making I hope you'll think of me. Until next time! And have FUN! (article written 2004)

 

Antiquing a Quilt




I certainly I don't think I'm an expert on the subject, but there is a look that I love, and without trying very hard I can make it work.

Having been asked, on numerous occasions, how I get an old fashioned, antique look to the quilts that I make, I have to say I love the darker, more dramatic colors. When out fabric hunting, it's those that I look for. I'm more of the Old Master's work kind of person. There are stories about impressionistic paintings and how they came about. When the old masters ran out of black, impressionism was born. They started painting lighter and brighter paintings and watercolor quilts are perfect for this.

My special love is working with plaids. When I use them, I'm not fussy about having them straight and on the line of the plaid when I cut them. This makes them have a tendency to be a bit off kilter. I also like working with grayed down colors that have prints of medium or larger size. Never do I work with solid colors, because I like the idea of all those textures you get with prints, plaids, checks and calicos.

Hardly ever buying a tremendous amount of any one fabric makes me run out, and forces me to look for another similar, but different fabric for the quilts I make. After all, Gramma certainly wouldn't have had bolts of fabric to work with. She made do with what she had.

I have a tendency not to have high contrasts going on most of the time, and love the way your eye has to search out what's really happening in the quilt, as opposed to having it all there in the first glance.

I love the old traditional blocks, but hate the inset seams, so make sure to take them out when designing my blocks. It does add extra pieces and seams, but it can be made to look scrappier, and that's what really makes me happy.

I have never over-dyed fabrics to gray them down, as there are so many wonderful fabrics out there, but I do tea-dye muslin for an older, worn look. This picture of Aunt Maggie's Dancin Shoes has muslin which I did tea dye.

Hand quilting is what I think makes the quilt look older. There is nothing wrong with machine quilting, and I have seen some beautiful work. However, I'm about as old fashioned as they come, and prefer hand quilting. I'm not particularly fussy about each stitch being perfect. If it happens it happens, if not, it was suppose to look like that. I like the way an over all quilting pattern looks on my quilts. It adds another dimension to the quilt when finished.

I hope some of these ideas or thoughts on the subject helps you make the quilt you are making, look a little like an antique. Gramma would be proud!

 

Pattern Corrections




Each time a pattern is born considerable effort is made to make sure it's correct; however, from time to time in my excitement to share a new pattern, errors occur. This is the place to come first to see if a correction has been made if you feel the pattern you have is not correct. Or, if you just have a question about a pattern, please contact me lynda@primitivepiecesbylynda.com and I will be glad to talk with you about it. If you have an incorrect pattern I will be more than happy to send you a corrected one if you will provide me with your mailing address. Again, I apologize in advance for any errors that may occur.

PRETTY PANSY POSEY PATCH has the following corrections - This quilt has a wonderful vine that grows in the 2nd border, along with some leaves. In each corner there is another pansy posey but in the directions you have it doesn't tell you how they get there. This error has been corrected and updated in current patterns, but if you have an older one....this will explain how it goes.

Before making your vine for the second border, I suggest finishing all borders first. Cut 1 1/2 inch strips of assorted green fabrics and sew them together making your vine. Fold under 1/4 inch and press all the way down, turn it over and fold under 1/4 inch and press all the way down the other side. Pin your vine in place and applique it on. The leaves are generic ones, and you can vary the size a bit to make things interesting. A pansy posey is appliqued on in each corner, overlapping the outside border. Refer to your colored pattern cover for placement.

PRAIRIE CHRISTMAS STAR It has been brought to my attention that some of you could possibly have the wrong templates in your pattern. If you will write to me directly I can send you the corrected ones. Also, just a note, you will see a page in your pattern that has the E template piece along with what looks like the logs for the outside part of your star square. This is only to show you placement. The logs templates for your block are included and show the correct seam allowance.

I have just heard of this error July 30, 2004. Any patterns sold after this date will be corrected. Thank you!

THE HAT LADIESOnly the earliest patterns ever sold will have errors in the patterns. The rotary cutting instructions for The Hat Ladies were mixed up. These are the correct rotary cutting instructions: A piece - pink/creams/blacks - cut 3 3/8 inch squares and cut diagonally twice to make 4 small triangles B piece - pinks/creams - cut 3 inch squares and cut diagonally once to make 2 triangles C piece - red/black/green - cut 5 1/2 inch squares and cut diagonally twice to make 4 triangles D piece-plum/rose reds - cut 6 1/2 inch squaers for the centers of your block. NOTE: This square will appear to small, but because the ABC units you make to sew on two sides of this square is all biased - pin at each end and work the rest in - it fits perfectly. The block is 12 inches finished.

MOONSHINEThe rotary cutting instructions for Moonshine are absolutely correct; however, the templates do not match. Use either all the templates, which will make your pieces smaller OR use all the rotary cutting instructions to make the quilt as it appears. Sorry for this confusion. I decided the template pieces were way to small so enlarged it a little and forgot to go back and change the template pieces.

NIGHT FLIGHTIt seems that after all this time, Night Flight has a slight error. The A piece directions say cut 1 1/2 inch strips into 1 1/2 inch squares. If you have cut them that way you will end up with a 16 inch block instead of 17 inches stated in the pattern. If you cut those A squares 2 inches, the block will be 17 inches as stated in the pattern. Either way the block will go together just fine. It just will end up a difference size. Sorry about the confusion.

GRAMMA'S VEGETABLE SOUPThe drawing in your packet is correct, the cutting instructions is also correct. However, it seems that the written words don't correspond, so here are the corrected written words for this pattern:

1. Start with the center by sewing 4 red a's together making a square. Set this on point to add the next sections.

2.Sew 2 yellow b's and 1 red b together. To the top of this unit (red center piece) add 1 orange B. Make 4 and sew these onto the corners.

3. To a Red C piece sew onto each side an orange B piece. Refer to your drawing. To each end of this, add one Green B piece. Make 4 - sew one onto each side.

4. The last part will be to add one Blue A piece to each corner. You have completed your first block. This quilt has 16 blocks that you will make exactly as shown above. The rest of your pattern instructions are correct.

MY YESTERYEAR COLLECTIONIn the new booklet, there is a typo error. It says you should make 5 of the geese units, when it should read 6.......everything else in the pattern is correct. I apologize for this inconvenience.

PINNY'S POSIESIf you have one of the old Pinny's Posies pattern the template cutting instructions letters were reversed. Here are the correct letters and how many to cut for each block: 8 Red A's, 8 Middle value yellow A's, 8 Black B's, 4 middle value yellow b's, 4 dark yellow (brown) b's. There is a total of 32 pieces per block.

The block size in the old patterns could say 12 inch blocks.....this is incorrect. They are 16...so if you have that in your pattern, please write to me for a corrected pattern. There is also a question about the borders. I love the way each border looks being different...so if your pattern says Top and bottom borders are 4 inches finished, right side 5 inches finished, and left side 6 inches finished.....that is correct. You may choose to have them all the same size with post blocks..it's up to you.

BAKING DAYThe cutting instructions in the pattern are correct, but the template letters on the visual provided do not reflect this. They should read D&E for the 2 3/8" x 8" logs and the corner triangles should read F & G.

SHE LOVES ME SHE LOVES ME KNOTOn 06/11/08 it was brought to my attention that there are errors in this pattern. It's confusing because the instructions say the block is 15 inches and the cover says 14 1/2. This is why. The center block where you applique the ring of flowers is 14 1/2 inchs, but there is a strip 1 1/2 inches that is added to one side so that the 5 HST strip will fit. The outside sashings or border's if you want to call them that measure 3 1/2 by 15 1/2 instead of 3 1/2 by 15. I do apologize for these errors and I appreciate Jeannette for letting me know. If you purchased this pattern before the date mentioned above you will need to make these changes. Otherwise, the pattern printed now will reflect them.

SNOW TRAILSIt has been brought to my attention that Snow trails has a couple type errors....it states that the finished block is 6 1/2 inches, which is correct. However, it states that you should cut the squares 6 1/2 inches instead of 7....seven inches is correct. Also, it states that there are 28 inside double trail blocks and there are 31. There has also been questions about the fabric requirements being to low. Fabric requirements are always estimated. I make everything as scrappy as I can and I don't always give the most accurate amounts. If anything I am probably conserative due to the fact that most of us have so much fabric in our stash. Your local quilt shops are there to help you if you have any questions.

PETER PAUL AND AUNT MARYThere has been a question regarding the template size for this quilt. Because of the size of the template it was printed on 4 pages. It has to be overlapped so that it will fit the 12 1/2 inch square you will place it on to cut it out. However, it doesn't state for you to do that. And, down at the bottom for template B it states you should not overlap....that is wrong. If you overlap the template A pieces approx. 1/2 inch both ways the template b piece will overlap that much as well. These templates include the 1/4 inch seam allowance. Having said all that, when you sew all the pieces together the block will probably measure 12 3/4 inches....TRIM THIS DOWN TO THE 12 1/2 BLOCK SIZE. I apologize for this error and corrections will be made to the original instruction sheet.

GATHERING BASKETSIt has been brought to my attention that there is an error in the Gathering Baskets pattern. On the third page the last paragraph it says to cut 6-9 3/4 inch squares. You will need to cut 33-9 3/4 inch squares in order for there to be enough to use for step 2 on page 4. Also, the diagram on page 3 shows the 9 3/4 inch square cut in 4 pieces. It should be only cut once to make 2 triangles. (I apologize for this error and personally thank Jeanne at Quilts Plus for bringing this to my attention) You will need to cut 9- 9 3/4 inch lighter squares to complete your sawteeth borders.

FUNDA BUNDLE 1The Railroad Crossing pattern in this bundle contains an error...Everything is correct, except the graphics showing how to put the block together. The center square should be placed on a table in front of you ON POINT. The three b's sewn together in groups of 3 are then sewn onto two sides of that center. The remaining two b units have a C triangle sewn onto each side, then sewn onto the center section. The corners, d template are sewn on and your block is complete. The cutting sizes are correct. The pattern instructions have been corrected and reprinted, however, if you have an older pattern please print these corrections and put it with your pattern for reference. I apologize for any inconvenience this has caused.

PRIMITIVE YOUNGINSIf you have purchased the Primitive Youngins book - you will find that there are some templates missing. The Hearts that the Primitive Youngins hold between their hands and the numbers for the Hopscotch Quilt are missing from your book. If you will email me, I will send you a PDF file so you can download them to tuck inside your book. Anyone purchasing the book from this day forward 06/08/10 will have them inside the book when you get it. I do apologize for this error.

A LITTLE PORCH TIME book It has been brought to the Kansas City Star's attention that corrections need to be made to the publication of their book. These are the corrections in the two Panels – C & E. Please accept our apologies for these errors.

Section C: Cut the bottom right piece 17” x 8 ½”

Section E - E2: After making the Nine Patch strip, sew a strip 21 ½” to each side (not 21”). Cut a strip of background fabric 1 ¾” x 24” (not 2 ¼” x 24”) to sew to the bottom of the zinnia/Nine Patch block.

E3: Cut the background for the sawtooth block 18” (not 18 ½”) x 20 3/4”, or if you prefer, piece the background with 2” strips along the left side and the top. After attaching the sawtooth strip, the block should measure 18” x 24”. Trim if necessary.

THE BUNDLING BOARDThe applique pieces in the Bundling Board pattern need to have the seam allowance added. It does show the center and leaf as having it already there; however, the outside line on the leaf is the correct finished size. Add a seam allowance to it as well. The center piece IS correct.

Angelic Bundle The math shown on the angel drawing in your pattern is incorrect.   Please write to me and I will be happy to send you a revised copy.  Also, there are no templates shown for the fence posts and/or railings.  You can cut the posts 1/2 inch wide x 3 inches tall and cut the railings 1/4 inch x 5 inches...refer to your drawing...they just need to fit in the space on each side of the cabin.  As of 11/23/11 the pattern has been corrected.

GRAMPA'S SAW MILL - It has been brought to my attention that  there is a typo on page 1 of the pattern instructions down at the bottom.  It says Cut 16 - 2 7/8 inch squares - cut one (should be once) diagonally to make 32 orange triangles.  I apologize for this error.

Thank you

 

 

Vist to Memphis Quilt Guild, 2004

 

I was asked to be the guest speaker and teach an all day class at the UNCOMMON THREADS QUILT GUILD in Memphis, Tennessee. I had the best time there and just wanted to share the experience with all of you.

 

Click to enlarge

 

Nancy, Etta and Charla were there to meet me at the airport. They took me to lunch and then a wonderful tour of their city. We even went to the Metal Arts Museum, where Nancy volunteers. This is where this picture was taken.



Click to enlarge

 

After our tour of the city, there was just enough time to quickly change clothes, load up all the quilts, meet several other members for dinner and go to the meeting.



Click to enlarge

 

I'm not sure of the actual attendance, but the room was packed. The meeting is held in a church. The facility is great for a class because of all the wonderful light and space.



Click to enlarge

 

Auntie Bean's Stalks was the quilt everyone was working on. It was so much fun to see everyone's fabric choices. While teaching the class, we also had some discussion about color.



Click to enlarge

 

Everyone gets instructions regarding the construction of the block. There are no inset seams in any of the patterns I create....I think some were surprised at how easy this pattern really is.



Click to enlarge

 

It was fun to see everyone sharing their fabric pieces with each other. The color choices were very interesting. It was great to see some thinking outside the box and doing it their way. I loved seeing some of the pinks being introduced...after all, pink is nothing more than red with white in it. Oh, and those plum/reds (purples) are what's so good with what color? I'll let you think about that one. And, everyone that chose to make their Auntie Bean's Stalks with other colors gets an atta-girl from me! So many people will not make a pattern unless it looks just like what's on the cover...What's up with that?



Click to enlarge

 

Each time someone would finish a block, everyone would want to stop and check it out. You'll see several pictures of finished blocks on the design wall.

Click to enlarge

 

It was great to see everyones interest in what other people were making. It's that kind of sharing in a class that is wonderful. We learn so much for each other.



Click to enlarge

 

I told everyone that if everyone in the class just finished one block there could be a couple of quilts made that could be raffled off to a couple of lucky winners....I had no takers! Then we talked about 3 blocks being a wonderful table runner.....some liked that idea. I wonder if these gals can pick out the ones they made? There are 3-4 different student's blocks hanging up.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

It was great fun being with everyone that attended the class. A couple of people had to leave before this picture was taken, but you can see that everyone did it their way! How fun!



Click to enlarge

 

I'm told that no one would believe I was in Memphis unless I had my picture taken by the Elvis sign at Graceland. See, I was there! And, I also signed my name on the Graceland Wall.

Thank you to all the members of the Uncommon Threads Quilt Guild for inviting me to their meeting.

And, a very special Thank you to Charla and Tom for having me stay with them while I was there. I came home with such fond memories and friendships I will cherish forever.

 

 

 

Visit to Wichita Kansas Quilt Guild,



How many of you believe that things happen for a reason? It's uncanny how being in the right place at the right time can make a difference. Two years ago, I stayed on for festival in Houston after doing quilt market. I was away from home for 14 days but because I did that I met two wonderful women that I will never forget. Mary Hutton and Lisa Johnson came in my booth more than a usual amount of times during festival. Oh, they would wander off to see what was there, but kept coming back. We had a great time together. They were also the ones that encouraged their guild to invite me to be a guest speaker at the August meeting of the Prairie Quilt Guild in Wichita, Kansas.

I just returned from Wichita where I taught two all day classes and spoke at their afternoon and night meeting. You see, this guild has around 900 of the most delightful members. Here are a few pictures taken while I was there.

A special thank you from the bottom of my heart for letting me be a part of your group and letting me show you all 38 quilts in my pattern line.

 

Click to enlarge

 

From left to right, Mary Hutton, me and Lisa Johnson. This picture was taken in Lisa's new quilt shop in Wichita...The Picket Fence. I hope if you're in the area that you'll stop by and visit.



Click to enlarge

 

Monday's class made Tying the Knot. from left to right - Merlene (This was the very first quilt block she had ever made, Mary, Debbie, Gizelle, Kathy and seated - Brenda



Click to enlarge

 

Wednesday's class was Burning the Midnight Oil - from left to right - Mary, Brenda, Sherry,Sandy, Pat and Lynne. Seated is - (l)Barbara and Linda

 

 

Primitives of the Midwest Gathering 2005



Every time I am asked to attend a gathering to teach it's always "ME" that comes home having learned from others there. That's what is so much fun. I just returned from The Primitives of the Midwest Gathering which was hosted by Rita Briner from Quilter's Station in Lee's Summit, Missouri. It was 4 fun filled days of seeing old friends, meeting new ones, sewing, shopping, eating, sewing and more shopping and very little sleep. Rita's Staff and friends took very good care of all of us. Every day were were treated to a wonderful lunch prepared entirely by the people that work there. We were able to drive to surrounding areas and visit antique shops, other quilt shops including trips to surrounding towns. We were treated to a wonderful visit to Missouri town. We were transported back to the 1800's. My very favorite time period. Since you couldn't make it this year,I'd like to share some of the pictures that were taken during this event. And, next year I hope you will join me in Lee's Summit for the next gathering.

 

Click to enlarge

Donna and me at the house before we left for the airport



Click to enlarge

 

This picture was taken of Donna (left), jeanne and me at the airport at gate 33. We had a good flight.



Click to enlarge

 

I stayed by the luggage outside while Jeanne and Donna were inside. There was this car and an older looking Pick up. I knew we had lots of luggage, but I sure was hoping they didn't come out with the keys to the pick up.



Click to enlarge

Family Branch Class



Click to enlarge

Burning the Midnight Oil Class



Click to enlarge

Primitive Sketches Class

 

 

Christmas at our House 2004

 

Every year for almost 31 years, our southern family (those that live here in Florida) have gathered at our house for Christmas. Over the years, not everyone could make it, but it's usually a boistrous bunch when they can. We number 25 now.

Our little Rebecca is our only grandchild, for the moment, and this year she will be 2. For Grampa and me she has been a wonderful blessing and we are enjoying her so very much.

These are pictures from Christmas 2004. I hope you enjoy visiting my home and perhaps when it's Christmas time again this year, I will update the pictures.

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 
Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 
Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

 

 

 

 

Vist to Michigan Quilt Guild

 

Lori Rippey, pictured below, contacted me months ago and asked if some of my quilts could attend their quilt guild show in September of this year. The guild is called "The CJBC Threaders". Ten of my quilts were shipped to her and were showcased at this show. It was held in the Iron County Museum in Caspian, Michigan. Thanks Lori! You did a wonderful job of displaying them.

These same quilts can be seen right now at Merricks DBA Ben Franklin's, 100 Coles Drive, Marquette, Michigan. If you are in the area these quilts will be there until October 2nd.

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

 

Primitives of the Midwest Gathering 2006

 

Rita Briner from Quilter's Station is one of the most gracious hostesses you'll ever meet. She started Primitives of the Midwest two years ago and asked me, along with many other teachers, to create some projects others could have fun making! That's about all she had to say to us. We hopped on a plane and the rest is history!

This years event almost doubled last year's retreat and it sounds like many more will be coming next year. Everyone has a great time.

Rita's staff is always on hand to make sure every teacher/student has what they need. Each day there is a special lunch prepared by these same staff members....and oh my! It's great. And, Edie's desserts are to die for! I hope some day you'll be able to come play with us in Lee's Summit at Quilter's Station. I know you will have a grand time. Below you will find some pictures I took while there. (More pictures to come soon!)

 

Click to enlarge

 

Rita Briner and me in front of Quilter's Station. We all start to look a like wearing our t-shirts that are available. These gals design the T-shirts and each year they are different. What is really nice is that you don't have to bring lots of clothes to wear and it gives you more room in your suitcase for all the wonderful goodies you find there. I haven't gotten that under control yet. Big Bertha always costs me money at the check in counter at the airport because she weighs so much!



Click to enlarge

 

Laura, me and Donna standing in front of the Honey Bee's and Butterflies. The wall hanging that was made at PMW.



Click to enlarge

 

Honey Bee's and Butterflies was a wallhanging I made for this event. It's made out of homespuns and wool for the basket handle and flowers. The flowers can be cut free hand! (However, the pattern will have templates included) Hmmm, I wonder if Rita has any kits left?



Click to enlarge

 

Amy, me and Sue posing after the nine patch qeese class. Be sure to ask the girls how easy this one is. They practically had the whole top made.



Click to enlarge

 

This nine patch geese quilt is in the "My Yesteryear Collection" booklet introduced at spring market in Minneapolis. I bet if you're quick, The gals at Quilter's Station would be happy to make up a kit for you. www.quiltersstation.com



Click to enlarge

 

back from l to r - Donna, Sharon, Nancy, Sue, Cathy, Sandy, Sharlyn. Front l to r Kendee, me, Mary.

The girls in the Wool table rug class had the best time free handing all the pieces they needed to make their rug. A lot of them made the long version of this, but some needed to have a different size. Everyone did a great job. The 3 pictures below are the ones I made for the class......after that you will see pictures of the table rugs the girls made.



Click to enlarge

 

A mile long table runner made out of wool was the project for this class.....but other sizes were offered as well. The next two pictures will show you two other sizes.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

Not everyone made the same sized rug. Long and skinny is fine if you have the space, but sometimes you just need a square shape. Also, check out the fact that the background is two different fabrics.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

Nancy needed an extra large table rug. It turned out really fun. Normally one to cut from templates, Nancy free handed each of these pieces. Enlarge the picture to see how she did the end pieces. How fun!



Click to enlarge
 

 

 

 

Visit to Brandon Quilt Guild

 

This July (2006) I was invited to the Brandon Florida Quilt Guild to teach an all day class and speak at their meeting.

Only a two hour drive from home I packed up early on Saturday morning and arrived in Brandon to find 19 gals ready to get to work. I had them precut their pieces - using templates no less! I know, I know, no one likes templates, but like I told them, make friends with templates; you never know when you need one!(Scrappy is done best this way!) They had read all the instructions in the pattern and were ready for a fun day of just sewing! They had chosen SHOTGUN WEDDING as their project and I was very impressed with their results. I couldn't wait to share pictures with all of you.

I drove back down to Brandon Monday evening to speak at their meeting and I forgot to take my camera. I was totally surprised to see how many of these gals completed their tops. I'm hoping many of them send pictures to share in the parlor room. Raedene already has and I've posted her quilt top there for you to see.

I want to say THANK YOU to the Brandon Quilt League for inviting me to come play with them and to say how much fun I had. You all did a wonderful job! Lynda

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

Sarah sent me this lovely version of her Shotgun Wedding. She told me it was a Romantic Shotgun Wedding! Thanks Sarah. The following two pictures were also sent by Sarah. These pictures were taken at the Monday night Show 'n tell meeting. Guess who forgot her camera that night?!



Click to enlarge

 

Sara sent me a couple of pictures to share of the show 'n tell at the Monday night meeting of their league. So many of the girls had their tops made by then and were ready to share with others their accomplishments

 

Click to enlarge

 

Another show 'n tell picture. I hope as the girls complete their quilts that I will receive more pictures to share. Thanks again for a wonderful time spent with your league

 

 

 

Breast Cancer Project 2008

In 2008, my pattern club + friends dedicated some time to make quilt blocks that were designed by me, pieced together by lots of them, then sewn together with love and donated to Quilts For a Cause, Inc. The 3 quilts that were made brought a good amount of money to go for research for women's cancers. You can see the last project from start to finish by clicking on a link on the telegraph page. I am excited to say another "block party" has come to a close. It has been so much fun working with everyone in 2008/09. Below you can see the block everyone will be making...it's easy and scrappy and lots of fun to make. It's right here that you will see everyone's block and the finished quilts as well. I hope you will join us in 2011 to help make a difference. Thank you, Lynda

Click to enlarge

This is the block everyone will be making for this special "block party" for cancer. The quilt blocks will be put together on point, as you see here. Everyone that signs up will receive an information packet in the mail.

Everyone's block that is returned to me will be photographed and posted as before.

IF you don't have time, please do not sign up. Perhaps next time would be better for you...But, IF you do have the time, Welcome aboard! Hugs, Lynda

Finished Quilts -

Click to enlarge

Scraps of Hope measures 92 inches square. Blocks were sewn together on point.

 

Participants who made the blocks were: Annette Austin, Cheryle Harte, Cheryl Mills, Raine Cavallo, Barbara Budelman, JoAnn Depeaux, Katrina O'Rourke, Cindy Herd, Jeannette Morrison, Gaye Smith, Joan Coyle, Lynda Hall, Cheryl Knapp, Cathy Hansen, Maggie Honeyman, Lynn Ray, Linda Orizondo, Alice Shaw, Kelly Van Deer, Carol Edwards, Jeanne Wortham, Dora Tomczak, Donna Phillips, Carol Crago, Cathi Gainey, Kathy Savage, Joyce Ann Lippet, Sandy Berger, Nancy Tester.

 Machine Quilter: Maggie Honeyman, Plano, Texas

 

Click to enlarge

Scraps of Hope back.....fabric donated by Jeanne Wortham, Melbourne, Fla. Back made by Donna Phillips, Orlando, Fla.

 The blocks for this quilt were sewn together at an all day sew-in by Carol Crago, Donna Phillips, Jeanne Wortham and Lynda Hall

Click to enlarge

Memories and Miracles is 78 inches square. Blocks were put together straight with sashing in between.

 

Participants who made the blocks are: Liz Stanis, Minty Brewer, Barb Cribb, Dawn Denman, Debbie Manceni, Tina Weigner, Jeri Wolfe, Jason Watson, Tina Porter, Diana Ward, Claire Birch, Jill Cardamone, Marilyn Craid, Chelsie Hall, Kathy Savage, Eleanor Yost, Katrina O'Rourke, Jill, Cindy Rohr, Sally Frye, Annette Austin, Mary Lou Ward.

 

Machine Quilters, Dennis and Cindy Dickinson from Cordova, Tennessee

 

Click to enlarge

 

The backing material for this quilt was donated and made by Lynda Hall. The blocks were sewn together by Lynda Hall.

Click to enlarge

CROSSROADS TO A CURE is 83 x 87 inches. The blocks were sewn together on point.

 

Participants who made blocks are: Edith Mitchell, Kate Berman, Michelle Brown, Pamela Knudson, Joselle Wallace, Cheryle Harte, JoAnn Talbott, Martha Merrill, Cherie Reynolds, JoAnn Depeaux, Barb Dangel, JoAnn DeSantes, Jill, Dixie Taft, Gayle Burton, Jason Watson, Carol Edwards, Bobbie Peck, LuAnn Leonard, Audrey Bretz, Minty Brewer, Pattie Kaliszewski, Lynda Hall, Bonita Jardine, Mary Walters, Jan Pittinger, Jan Fout

 

Machine Quilter - Pam Post from south Fla.

 

Click to enlarge

 

Crosswords to a cure backing was donated by Jeanne Wortham, Melbourne, Fla. and Lynda Hall and made by Lynda Hall

 

Click to enlarge

PIECES OF OUR HEARTS  measures 75 x 91. The blocks were sewn together on point.

 

Participants who made blocks were: Linda Unruh, Alice Shaw, Cindy Herd, Mary Ann Pendleton, Amy Decesare, Valerie McCallister, Cindy Olson, Wendy Burk, Marilyn Dabbs, Cindy Dickinson, Karen Gutowski, Cathy Bancroft, JoAnn Stuebing, Darcy Thursby, Katrina O'Rourke, Chris Phillips, Billie Fox, Cindy Dickinson, Carrie Mitchell, Lonae Swickard, Jeannette Morrison, Debbie Greenfield, Paula Hammer, Terry Hara, Jane Fout, Amanda Rollins, Nancy Ryder, Maureen Rosetti, Denise Felipe, Liz Stanis, Cathi Gainey

 

Machine Quilter - Cheryl Mills from Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina

 

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

The backing material was donated and made by Lynn Ray from Gurnee, Illinois. What a super back you made Lynn......Thank you so much!

 

The blocks for this quilt were sewn together at an all day sew-in by Carol Crago, Donna Phillips, Jeanne Wortham and Lynda Hall.

 


 

 

 

 

 

Quilts for a Cause Project
Click image for detail

Quilts for a Cause Project

After the last group projects for Quilts for a Cause, Inc. they asked me to design a quilt pattern for them that they could market.  So, Twist 'n Shout was designed.  Carol Crago and I worked on making the quilt and it was then quilted and shipped to Arizona where Quilt For a Cause, Inc. took over, wrote the instructions and is now selling it from their site.  If you haven't gotten a copy, I hope you'll do so......the proceeds go to women's cancer.  Visit their site and order your copy today.  Thanks!

pattern cover - twist 'n shout

Halloween at our House, 2006

 

Decorating for the holidays is always fun at my house. The bigger the holiday or season, the more stuff you'll see. The fall, especially, is a favorite for me. There are so many talented people among us that make the most fun dolls and, of course, my all time favorites are the ones that look the most pitiful. They usually end up coming to live with us. The table rugs or quilt items you see are made by me. I hope you enjoy the pictures you'll see below.

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions



A trip to the mail box each day is part of what I do. I receive orders from you, but also get mail asking me questions. The occasional piece of mail comes too, that isn't what I would call "fan" mail either. But, that's all part of life and how we grow. When I get a letter from you I usually write back individually, but thought perhaps others had the same questions, so this is how this page came about. I will be posting questions and answers here on the web site, so I hope you will stop by from time to time to see what others want to know....

QUESTION: From a shop owner who asked "Why do you fold your patterns in half? If the name of the pattern wasn't so big you could put the picture on half a page.

ANSWER:As a quilter, I got frustrated with other patterns that didn't provide a large enough picture to see any detail. So, when I started Primitive Pieces by Lynda I wanted a larger visual for the QUILTER so that once you get it home you have a bigger picture to study. I'm proud of this distinction in my patterns and hope other pattern company's will soon follow.Changes have been made to the patterns I carry. They are now opened up with a full picture for you to view on the cover.

QUESTION: Why do you use brown paper?

ANSWER: Primitive Pieces by Lynda, as the title suggests, is a more primitive style. Dark and dirty as they say. I have experimented on lighter paper and the primitive look just doesn't happen. A balance between clarity and primitive style is strived for each time a new pattern comes out.

QUESTION: I'm not a big fan of reading text in a pattern; could you add more visuals?

ANSWER: The early patterns didn't have many visuals. I am an avid reader and of course thought everyone else loved the same thing! I did find that not to be the case, so there are more visuals in my patterns now. Look for even more in the future. Oh, there will still be the story at the top, and yes, I will continue to write the words but now you will have more drawings. And, I am always available if you need help!

QUESTION: How do you come up with the fabric requirements for your patterns?

ANSWER: LOL, that question always makes me smile. I'm not the precise kinda gal. Every quilt is usually so scrappy that it's so difficult to get it exact, so I don't even try. I try to give a ball park amount. Most of us have a stash to rival, in dollars, the national debt. What I would like is that everyone choose their colors for the pattern they will be making and then see what "else" you might need to enhance or complete the amount you need. I LOVE running out of fabrics. It makes me THINK about what would go with what I'm making and use something different. Gramma didn't have what we have. She did the best she could. If a pattern calls for 1 1/2 yards of red........it should be a total of assorted reds. That could be 6 fat quarters. Your local quilt shop owners will be more than happy to help you...Aw, another excuse to visit your favorite place!

QUESTION: How do you pick out the colors for your quilts?

ANSWER: We all love CERTAIN colors and that's reflected in our homes. BUT, there are only 6 colors to choose from: Red, Blue, Yellow - the three primary colors and if you mix two of those primary colors together you get 3 secondary colors: Green, Orange, Purple. That's it! 6 colors is all you get ever. So, in answer to the question I try to use all of them. That's what scrappy quilts are and why they will always work.

QUESTION: Your quilts always look so warm, What colors do you use to achieve that?

ANSWER: One of the easiest ways to warm up a quilt is to take the WHITE out of it. White makes things crisp and new looking. White is also not a color, nor is black. It's also not the color you use, but the VALUE you use of that color. Try using fabrics that are more grayed down or even darker in color. You can achieve a richness in color, but a warmer look by darkening the value.

QUESTION: How in the world do you get the plaids in your quilt to match?

ANSWER: They don't! Why would they need to? If you are cutting a large square, only to cut it diagnoally twice to make 4 triangles, each piece will be different. And, if you cut them sorta crooked to begin with it's even better. That's part of the older look that I can achieve with my quilts. Perfect is certainly not in my vocabulary. I want an older looking, more g-whoppied quilt. When you look at an antique quilt, doesn't it scream - wear, tear and lots of love? Let go of the concept that everything needs to be perfect and have more fun.

QUESTION: I get so frustrated because I can't get my corners to match or the star points to be perfect, what can I do?

ANSWER: Sorry, you are talking to the wrong person. If a point is perfect and four or nine patch corners match exactly, remember, I'm the one that celebrates and has a hot fudge sundae! It's not something that really has to happen for me. I love making quilts and I love having fun......the two must go together! I love people that can relax and just let things happen. However, I do promise you that if I have a quilt that is absolutely perfect in every way, I'll still sleep under it.

QUESTIONDo you ever travel to teach classes or speak at events

ANSWER Yes, I do travel when I can. I love speaking at quilt quild meetings and teaching classes. I have done so many times. If you are interested in me coming to your area, please let me know.

 

Christmas at our House 2006



Christmas 2006! It was an unusual Christmas for us this year with fewer family members in attendance. When we gathered around the table this year to ask the blessing, we asked that everyone continue to enjoy good health. Life is way to short and we need to remember to embrace each day to the fullest. I hope you enjoy seeing how our house was decorated for Santa's arrival this year. Thank you for visiting with us. Lynda

 

Click to enlarge

 

Setting the tables are always fun for me. My nephew and his wife, from Las Vegas, couldn't be with us this year, so they sent the lovely flowers for the table.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

I apologize for the quality of the pictures. Some turned out to dark and some to blurry. I wonder if it was the camera or the photographer? hmmm

Every cupboard with a flat surface wasn't left out this year.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge

 

My santa made me this wonderful cupboard to house my computer for the office in the sewing room. I'm just thrilled with it!



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

these pictures are hanging in the sewing room office. Fun little primitive cards. My brother in law made me the frames. I painted them black and distressed them.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

Presents under the tree isn't what christmas is all about for me. But, it's certainly a part of what goes on. I hope each of you had a very Merry Christmas, until next year............

 

 

 

 

Magazine Articles

Vivian Ritter from the Quilter's Newsletter Magazine was instrumental in having two of my quilts featured in their "Quilt it for Christmas" magazine.  I am very proud to have been chosen for this honor.  It was an added bonus that they each made the cover.  If you missed either of these issues you can still purchase the pattern from the patterns page....ppl006 Cranbrook Christmas and ppl014 Prairie Christmas Star.

 quilt it for christmas - cranbrook christmas

 

 quilt it for christmas magazine cover

Quilt Country Magazine from France did an article on me this fall, 2011.   My friend Veronique writes for the magazine.  Thanks Vero and Quilt Country Magazine.

quilt country - france, magazine coverquilt country - magazine article pg 1quilt country - magazine articlequilt country magazine - article page 3

Primitives of the Midwest Gathering 2007

 

Primitives of the Midwest, a quilting retreat, is sponsored by Rita Briner and her gals from Quilter's Station in Lees Summit, Missouri. I've been honored to teach there since she started this gathering in 2004.

This retreat is a 4 day event. Teachers are brought in from around the country and students from all over come too. Each year the gathering increases in size. I hope one day you'll join me there for 4 days of fun filled days of sewing, shopping, eating, sewing and so much more.

 

Click to enlarge

Rita and Lynda

Click to enlarge

Sandy Luebbert

Click to enlarge

Linda Poe(Libby) and Judy Cash

Click to enlarge

Liz Stanis and Jeri Wolfe

Click to enlarge

Kara Austin

Click to enlarge

Debbie Lillich

Click to enlarge

Gayle Wade

Click to enlarge

Jackie Lillich

Click to enlarge

Kara Austin

Click to enlarge

Liz and Gayle

Click to enlarge

Jackie and Debbie

Click to enlarge

 

Click to enlarge

BR from left - Jeri, Liz, Nancy and Barb, FR from left, Laura, Lynda and Cathy 

Click to enlarge

As you can see, someone is always capturing a memory! Hope you can join us next year!

Click to enlarge

Shirley Goodness 'n Mercy Class picture 

Visit to the Ft. Myers Guild Show

 

I was invited to attend a retail show in Ft. Myers in January of this year, 2008. It was a very good show for everyone that attended. I took mom with me this time and we had a wonderful weekend together. After eating dinner at the crab shack at the hotel, we sat on our balcony, drinking wine and enjoying this wonderful view.

 

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

 

Breast Cancer project 2005

A SPECIAL PROJECT! I was asked by a friend that knew a friend, and so on....to design a block that others could make and eventually be turned into a quilt and/or quilts that could be auctioned off next year to raise money for breast and/or ovarian cancer. I wish I could take the credit for this, but Quilts for a Cause, Inc. is the group that have asked for this help. There is not one of us that have not been touched in one way or another by this horrible disease. Each person working on this project sent me personal letters when they returned their blocks telling me that their block was dedicated to a friend or a family member. I was so touched by everyone's letters and felt that no matter who ended up with the quilts we made they couldn't help but know each stitch came from the heart. I am so grateful to my pattern club members and some of their friends for their support. Names for the quilts were voted on and here are the names chosen: MANY HANDS, MUCH HOPE, FLOWERS OF HOPE AND MY SISTER'S FLOWER GARDEN A very special THANK YOU to everyone that participaed. On the following pages you will see the blocks everyone made, the quilt tops put together, and then the finished quilts. Our project is now complete and all three quilts have been sent to Tucson, Arizona to Quilts for a Cause, Inc. The auction is to be held in October. You can see the quilts that have been donated by visiting their website....www.quiltforacause.org On a more personal note, this entire project took on a much more personal note when we lost my sister, Sharron Mudore, to lung cancer this year. She was able to participate in this project and I know she's smiling now that it's been completed. Good job everyone! Hugs, Lynda

Click to enlarge

This is the block everyone worked on.  The block is a flower block, 15 inches square.  I do believe the recipient of this quilt(s) will have a lovely flower garden!

Here are the finished quilts -

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

FLOWERS OF HOPE

Row 1 (l/r)Cindy Dickenson, Ingrid Quitslund, Marie Beers, Cindy Dickenson, Cherie Reynolds; Row 2 (l/r) Alice Shaw,Pat Harrell, Tammy Maki, (?), Jeri Wolfe; Row 3 (l/r) Ingrid Quitslund, Cathy Hansen, Sindy Herd, Sue Higley, Cathleen Rainey; Row 4 (l/r) Kathy Clemons, Liz Stanis, Alice Shaw, Patti Levine, Jeannie Arnieri

 Click to enlarge

 

This picture is of the breast cancer block quilt that Cheryl Mills machine quilted. It has been shipped off to Quilts for a Cause, Inc. I am so proud of everyone that participated on this project. Thank you so very much. I know everyone that sees this quilt will be impressed with all the hard work and devotion you have shown and whomever bids the most and receives this quilt will know that it was done with alot of love from you.

Click to enlarge

This is the second breast cancer quilt completed. It's called "Flowers of Hope". Dori Hawks returned this quilt just the other day all completed. Thanks Dori.

Click to enlarge

 

The third and final quilt to be returned to me was quilted by Amber Coffey. This quilt is called "Many Hands Much Hope". Thank you Amber for your contribution.

 

I received a telephone call from Jeannie Beahan from Quilts for a Cause, Inc. this week saying all three of the quilts arrived safely and to say "Thank You" to each of you for your participation. She was delighted with the quilts. She informed me that it would take a couple of weeks for our quilts to show up on their website, but they will be there for you to see.

 

Her parting remark was that she would keep us in mind for future endeavors.

 

My Sewing Studio



 

 

My New Sewing Studio.

Many of you have asked for me to share my new sewing room with you. It's a first for me, so you can imagine how excited I am. Before having this studio, I designed every quilt you see as a pattern on my dining room table. My table is 10 feet long and so I was able to keep the mess to one end and eat dinner at the other. Sometimes the mess crowded in on dinner, and of course when company came, I had to clean up the whole thing. I was just happy to be sewing that it didn't matter.........until I got to see sewing studio's that other people have. So, I'm happy to share with you the before pictures, the current pictures and also when it's totally completed.

 

Click to enlarge

 

Before it became a sewing room, it was a back porch. We never used it as such, so it was a perfect place to make into a room to house all the Primitive Pieces by Lynda quilts that were in the making.



Click to enlarge

 

The porch measured 40 feet long by 12 feet wide and had two sets of french doors that came off the dining room. If this was going to be the place, I didn't even have to go outside to start work in the morning.



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

Skeeter, one of our bloodhounds made sure everything went well during the construction process



Click to enlarge
 

 

Click to enlarge

 

The shelves have been primed and painted and ready to be loaded........very soon!



Click to enlarge

 

The floor was primed and painted with two coats of barn red paint. It seemed to take forever to dry....delaying the moving in process.



Click to enlarge

 

mini blinds have been ordered for the windows and a curtain will cover the door.



Click to enlarge

 

a design wall was made and from my kitchen window I can look out into the room and make sure what's hanging on that wall looks ok.



Click to enlarge

 

Baseboards and electrical outlet covers are drying and will be installed soon. That's about all that is left to do.

 

 



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge
 
Click to enlarge

 

Moving day did arrive and it was a very exciting day. This is what you see when the french doors are opened. It's an area where one can sit and hand applique, hook, knit, etc.



Click to enlarge

 

Filling the shelves with fabric has been both a chore and a delight. I found that before I could even start on the downstairs shower (remember those 28 bags of fabric you've heard about?) I had to get what was sitting out and about on them first. So, it is a few pictures into the future where you'll see all the shelves full.



Click to enlarge

 

This old dresser will house office stuff once my computer cupboard gets in the room.



Click to enlarge

 

I found this wonderful tall skinny drawer unit in a favorite antique shop. It's perfect to store notions and sits behind where I'll be sewing.



Click to enlarge

 

a view of the sewing room



Click to enlarge

 

This cubby works really well for skeins of wool. Part of the fabric was rearranged so this could sit under the window.



Click to enlarge

 

This black wall cupboard was brought down from upstairs, hung on the wall and now holds yarn. Hopefully, I can find a wonderful cubby to sit on the floor under it...or perhaps a small table. Searching out pieces is always a fun time for me.

Click to enlarge

 

There will be an office end to the room. I'm still trying to find an old piece of furniture that will house my computer, etc.



Click to enlarge

 

Down in the sewing end, there is a bookshelf that wool and wool yarn is stored. Look for some fun projects coming your way!



Click to enlarge
 



Click to enlarge

 

A computer cupboard now sits in the office end of the room. My husband built me this cupboard. I painted it and distressed it and just love the way it looks. The office end is slowly becoming just that. I have a black filing cabinet that's modern so have hidden it between the french doors. Can't see it when they are open. Hopefully this end will be finished soon.

 

 

 

 

Primitives of the Midwest Gathering 2008

 

Primitives of the Midwest for 2008 has come and gone, but wonderful memories will be with all of us that attended. Sewing, visiting with old friends, meeting new friends, eating, shopping, cutting up and lots more of the same went on during our 4 days together. I hope you enjoy the pictures I'm sharing with all of you.

I hope you will be able to join in the fun one day. Hugs, Lynda

 

Click to enlarge

 

Jennifer Keltner, Editor of American Patchwork and Quilting was the guest speaker for opening night at PMW. She is a delightfully funny speaker who had lots of wonderful ideas to share. Her quilt show presentation included old quilts and new quilts...something for everyone to enjoy.



Click to enlarge

 

I taught three classes at the retreat. This is the first project....a sewing box everyone painted, distressed, and waxed. They made a quilt block for the top, along with a two decker pin cushion.



Click to enlarge

 

Here is a picture of the class. front row from L to R - Nancy, owner of The Hen House Quilt shop, Patty, me, Donna and Sharon. Back row L to R - Kathi, Barb, Nancy and Lorna



Click to enlarge

 

I don't know how many camera's were sitting on ready for a picture of all of us..but at one point I decided perhaps just to make it a little different we should all turn around...lol I don't think Sharon got word down at her end! There were two give aways in the color class. I can't remember if anyone took pictures of the winners....but Donna won a bag to hold thread and Lorna won a pin keep. They were made to match the block on the top of their boxes.



Click to enlarge

 

The color class was held at the shop. We had all day to play with tons of bolts of fabrics. Of course, everyone went home with some to add to their stash.....duh! This table runner was given away in this class. Jeri from Plano, Texas went home with it. Everyone signed it as a memento.



Click to enlarge

 

A picture of the color class. L to R - Julie Wardell, Liz Stanis, me, Jeri Wolfe, seated - Lin Evans and Kerry Green



Click to enlarge

 

This table rug or small wall hanging was the third project. It started out being a partridge in a pear tree.......but somewhere along the line the partridge flew away and another bird arrived...the piece is called TWO PAIRS. I'll let you figure that out.

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

Cathy Hansen and Cheryl Knapp had my full attention in this class. Cathy and I first met 4 years ago when Rita started PMW...This was Cheryl's first time to PMW......but she's coming back!



Click to enlarge

 

You can see it's not all work and no play for anyone there. By the fourth day, everyone gets just a little silly and everything becomes funny. We managed to hold it together until the class was over.



Click to enlarge

 

Cheryl told me she saved the best class for last..........just kidding everyone! She did tell me that she had a blast and hoped to return next year. A friend was to come with her, but couldn't make it and she was determined to come have fun anyway........good choice Cheryl!



Click to enlarge

 

Barb sitting at the sewing machine got her block quilted for the top of her box. Of course, we all stood around giving encouragement.



Click to enlarge

 

Edie and I think this show should be called the Edie show or the Lynda show as we both were seen taking one picture after another of each other. Somtimes at the same time. If I remember correctly, Edie told me that pictures of this event will be posted on Pickledish.com I hope you'll check it out.



Click to enlarge

 

After opening ceremonies, a lot of us go out to eat together. Here is Edie taking my picture. Sitting next to her is Cherie Ralston, Lynn Hagmier, Renee Plains and Maggie Bonanomi with her back to us.



Click to enlarge

 

After the last classes are put to bed Saturday afternoon, everyone gathers at the quilt shop for one last chance to see each other, enjoy pizza, purchase any last minute things you forgot and say the good-bye! Here's a picture of Sue Spargo at the party. The good-bye's are always the hardest, but we hold on to the memories we have and make promises to return next year.

 

Click to enlarge

 

Lyn and I had a chance to chat just before the opening ceremonies began. It was a delightful evening of seeing old friends and meeting new people.



Click to enlarge

 

It's very hard to say this with a straight face, but we do "teach" at primitives! lol



Click to enlarge

 

One of the hardest things about the last day is always saying good bye. Rita and her gals always make these 4 days very special for all of us that attend. A gracious host, and a good friend, Rita is one of the best!

 

 

 

 

Visit with the Cypress Creek Quilt Guild 2011



I was invited to spend a couple of days with the Cypress Creek Quilter's Guild in Lutz, Florida, February 1,2 2011. I had the best time sharing a 70+ quilt trunk show with them on Tuesday evening and teaching a class of 9 on Wednesday. They worked on Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam.

What was fun for me was seeing each of them put the block together using their own favorite fabrics and colorways. Below are the pictures from my time spent with them.

A very SPECIAL THANK YOU to the Cypress Creek Quilter's Guild for inviting me into their circle.

 

Click to enlarge

 

I was so impressed with the attendance by this guild! 126 members strong, 74+ in attendance this past Wednesday evening. It was so much fun speaking to a group that size! Well done Cypress Creek!



Click to enlarge

 

I was also impressed with the different number of committee's they had. Becky Dohr, the president called upon each committee chairmain to report. It was so impressive to hear about all the wonderful things they were involved with. Getting involved with your guild is so very important to it's success.



Click to enlarge

 

Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam was the quilt the class decided to make. Here's my version of the quilt. You will see how some of the students made it their way and how fun they turned out.



Click to enlarge

 

Becky Dohr, the president of the guild took my class and this is her block of Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam. It was so much fun to finally meet Becky. She's been in my pattern club for a long time!



Click to enlarge

 

Cathleene Tokish, the program chairmain of the league, was the one who contacted me about coming to play with these girls. I stayed with Cathleene in her home and had the best time.



Click to enlarge

 

Diane Keeports stitching on her Aunt Ree's Raspberry jam block. Diane chose to make a block a lot different from mine. I love it when someone takes a design and makes it their own. You'll see her block in the group picture.



Click to enlarge

 

Margie West hand stitching the center onto her Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam block. (Note) Margie had the best light hanging around her neck at this class. She gave me the information on how to order one and I purchased one today. Yeah! It's on it's way and if it works out ok, I will be selling these from my website soon!) I can't wait to get mine! Thanks Margie!

 

Click to enlarge

 

Margie West's Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam Block



Click to enlarge

 

Sue English's Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam block



Click to enlarge

 

Tina Rosenberg's Aunt Ree's Raspberry jam block....Tina actually made 4 of these blocks during class. I had to laugh because they deemed Tina the teacher's pet........aka Over Achiever! lol it was great to see Tina having such a good time.



Click to enlarge

 

Stephanie Parade's Aunt Ree's Raspberry Jam block



Click to enlarge

 

Class picture - from left to right - Diane Keeports, Elaine Cousineau, Diane Juranko, Cathleene Tokish, Becky Dohr, Tina Rosenberger, Margie West, stephanie Parades, Sue English....and me.



Click to enlarge

 

Much better lightning with this second group picture - and my special Thank you to all the gals that took the class. It was a day I'll remember always!

 

 

 



© 2011 Primitive Pieces by Lynda * All rights reserved. Powered by: Create A Shoppe. Design by 2 Friends Designs